Posts Tagged With: Red-tailed Hawks

A Glimmering Day at Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area

Snow Geese lit the Middle Creek. The natural connection they developed over time instituted a school of an incredible ecosystem.

The sky of Lancaster and Lebanon counties, Pennsylvania gets covered by Snow Geese every morning and evening since the mid-February 2017 and will continue until the end of March depending on the temperature rise and food availability. This human-made wildlife conservation site supporting diverse species year around, providing critical shelter to migratory birds since 1972. Not only human beings but also birds like shelducks are concerned about their security and future of existence. Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area provides absolute security and adequate ecosystem services for their well-being in general. Surrounding farmlands are a critical source of food besides the lake itself. Some observers might be dismayed observing waterfowl from a decent distance. All through the lake banks, there is fence keeping human away from migratory ducks and swans and other animals, which apparently protecting animal during their stopover at the creek. An onlooker can easily understand that how freely and confidently those birds are moving around. Snow Geese and Tundra Swans are an innately social animal; they love to stay together in a group. Rarely, an isolated swan is found in nature. During a flight, they fly in a ‘V’ formation in a group also called skein. As it was twilight on the horizon, small skeins were returning to the lake from nearby farmlands. Among big birds, Snow Geese and Tundra Swans are perhaps less aggressive than Canada Geese. During my visit, I haven’t seen a single fight among them but did witness two separate territorial battles of Canada Geese. This year is quite extraordinary because of two reasons – early arrival of Snow Geese and their astonishing number. Scattered gaggles of Snow Geese are present all over the lake surface. It is so difficult to photograph them under bright sunlight. Thousands of geese temporarily make middle creek their home to regain energy before heading to the north as temperature start rising in the East Coast of the USA.

Tundra Swan: character-wise they are so gracious than others. Hundreds of them were floating on the lake surface in small and medium gaggles. They do follow order at all doings and certainly enjoy togetherness. Few giggles were even accompanied by American Black Ducks, American Coot, and Great Blue Heron.

Geese Fight: Right before the dusk, witnessing a 15 seconds battle of 2 male geese wing to wing made my day. The male Canada Geese was hanging with a female geese mortified me by losing a duo with an intruder geese. The other geese stopped whatever they were doing to watch and honk. The second one, carnival barker, ultimately won the fight and took the girl away.

Other species I observed includes Common Merganser, Mallard, Belted Kingfisher, Downy Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Turkey Vulture, Song Sparrow, Sparrow sp, ring-necked ducks, Northern Flicker, chickadees and few others.

Categories: Avifauna, Natureholic, Uncategorized, Wildlife of North America | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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